MAKE THANK-YOU NOTES A TOP PRIORITY IN YOUR JOB SEARCH


Submitted By:  Judy Beaver, Part-time College of DuPage Instructor & CCC Board Member/Volunteer

 

Are thank-you notes part of your job search strategy? The possible reasons to thank someone during your job search include thanking someone for an interview, for an introduction, for help or advice, or for a recommendation. John Kralik, the author of 365 Thank Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed My Life, claims, as the title suggests, writing thank-you notes changed his life. Do you think writing thank yous could change your job search?

While no one likes to write them, people sure do like to receive them. People like to be appreciated, and you’ll make them feel special when you send one. And, writing thank-you notes is easier than you might think. Use this mnemonic to help you write your thank-you messages: GUESS.

Genuine. Show your genuine feelings when thanking someone.

Unique. Stand out from the crowd by using unique language, not overused business phrases. Imagine a human resource professional reading several thank-you-for-the-interview letters that all state, Thank you for your time and consideration. Does that sound original?

Error-free. Proofread your note. Be sure to prove your attention to detail, especially in a thank-you-for-the-interview letter. Be professional. Reinforce a good impression.

Specific. State in detail what you’re thanking the person for. Thank you for the introduction or thank you for the interview is too vague. Be specific. My cousin wrote a thank-you letter for a Christmas flower arrangement I sent; he described the arrangement in detail. I had ordered the flowers online, so I was grateful to know he received what I had ordered.

Short. Keep the message brief. The note doesn’t have to be a major undertaking.

 

Sending a thank you demonstrates your soft skills, something a resume doesn’t do. Emphasize your communication skills, positive attitude, and professionalism in your follow-up note. We have so many opportunities to acknowledge someone. Making it a part of your job-hunting strategy might change your outcome.




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